Why is Sleep So Important?

by Dr. David Minkoff July 13, 2016 2 min read

Why is Sleep So Important?

Millions of Americans suffer from sleepless nights. According to a 2011 Sleep in America poll, 63% of Americans say their sleep requirements aren't met—particularly during the week—and that this negatively impacts their mood, family life, home responsibilities and social life.

A good night’s sleep, on the other hand, is positively associated with improved memory, learning, immune function and metabolism. Here are several ideas to help the sleep-deprived become the sleep-satisfied.

Charles Czeisler MD, from the Harvard Medical School Sleep Program explains that daytime artificial lighting slows the release of melatonin—the sleep-promoting hormone, and it "shifts circadian rhythms to a later hour—making it more difficult to fall asleep." Circadian rhythm is the 24-hour sleep/wake cycle. Suggestions include minimizing exposure to artificial light before bed (TV, cells, computers etc.) and not sleeping with lights or TV on.

Here are some tips from experts to help you get to sleep:

  • Allison Harvey, PhD, sleep expert at UC Berkley says, "Take a look at your bedtime habits. Create a relaxing wind-down routine and turn down the lights."
  • Set a sleep schedule. Go to bed and wake up at the same times each day.
  • Expose yourself to bright light in the morning and avoid it at night. Dim your lights when it's close to bedtime.
  • Create a cool, comfortable sleep environment. If you're finding that entertainment or work-related communications are creating anxiety, remove these distractions well before bedtime.
  • Keep a "worry book" next to your bed. If you wake up because of concerns or worries, write them down, then let them go until morning.

Next, wind down with sleep-supportive products from BodyHealth:

 

All-Natural Sleep Product — Healthy Sleep Ultra*

Developed by BodyHealth’s founder Dr. David Minkoff M.D., Healthy Sleep Ultra is designed to support a healthy sleep/wake cycle through natural substances made in your body: the hormone melatonin and the neurotransmitter serotonin to promote a restorative sleep. In addition to other ingredients, it also contains two amino acids that have sleep-promoting and relaxing effects—L-Glycine and L-Glutamine. With no morning grogginess, you can take it even in the middle of the night to promote a restful sleep.