Lyme Disease: An Update and Nutritional Toolkit

by Dr. David Minkoff March 20, 2017 4 min read

Lyme Disease: An Update and Nutritional Toolkit

In 1909, Arvid Afzelius presented his research on an expanding, ring-like lesion, Erythema migrans (EM), linked to what would later become known as Lyme disease.

Lyme disease, as we know it today, was first identified in 1975 following an unexplained outbreak of arthritis near the town of Lyme, Connecticut.

Over the last 20 years, cases of Lyme disease have tripled and, in fact, the disease is believed to affect about 300,000 Americans each year.

What is Lyme disease? What are common symptoms of Lyme disease?

Lyme disease is a condition most often spread by blacklegged ticks and nymphs (immature ticks) found in wooded areas. In the United States, it is most prevalent in the Northeast (primarily Pennsylvania and New York) and the north Midwest (primarily Minnesota and Wisconsin) and coastal regions.

As to why it is spreading so far, and so rapidly, we only need to look to the ever-increasing deforestation and development that is forcing more and more deer, and ticks, into ever-increasing proximity to humans.

Unfortunately, Lyme disease can be very difficult to diagnose correctly. Unless you actually see the tick on your skin, you may not even know you were bitten until you start to experience a wide range of correlated symptoms. While it can be difficult to spot and diagnose, if left untreated Lyme disease can lead to debilitating neurological and cardiovascular effects.

In its early stages, the disease can seem much like the flu, with body aches, headaches, fatigue and fever, sometimes accompanied by a rash. Not everyone gets a rash, or gets the rash that looks like a bullseye. The rash begins as a small red spot and can either stay small, or spread to cover large parts of your body.

One of the more dangerous effects of Lyme disease is swollen and painful joints. If left untreated, as mentioned, this can lead to lifelong arthritis in patients with Lyme disease. These symptoms can also be met with further neurological effects like numbness or weakness in muscles, temporary paralysis of facial muscles, dizziness, shortness of breath and irregular heartbeat.

What are common treatments for Lyme disease?

While there are many theories on how to treat Lyme disease, perhaps one of the most highly regarded is ozone therapy. Ozone therapy can be administered intravenously (IV) through a process of ozonating the patient’s blood and sending it back through the body via IV. This therapy can be pursued on its own, or performed in accordance with other approaches, including body detox cleansing, Pulsed Electromagnetic Field Therapy (PEMF) and Pulsed Magnetic Field Therapy (MAS Mat).

How do I avoid getting Lyme disease?

If you are an avid outdoorsperson, or spend a lot of time outside and in or near wooded areas, taking precaution against blacklegged ticks is the best way to prevent getting Lyme disease in the first place. When walking or hiking in the summer, avoid contact with overgrowth and brush, where ticks may be hiding. To protect yourself against ticks, keep your extremities covered with light-colored clothing at all times, preferably with a strong, thick fabric. Wearing durable boots in areas with tall grass and brush can also help prevent a bite, though cannot completely eliminate the danger. While using an insect repellant with a 20-25% concentration of DEET may be safest, more natural options include Burt’s Bees Herbal Insect Repellent, Buzz Away, Green Ban for People, and Natrapel Plus. Check for ticks when returning from the outdoors and shower within two hours.

Life with Lyme disease

Symptoms of pain, joint and muscle aches and fatigue linger for months or weeks for many patients. Some individuals live with chronic Lyme disease, like World Champion Professional Triathlete Lesley Paterson. “I often think that living with chronic Lyme’s disease is like a boxing match,” writes Lesley. “Some days I’m in total control of the fight […] Then out of the blue, BAM! […] I can go from hero to zero in 48 hours.” Read Lesley’s story and how she takes on the challenge of Lyme disease.

“In my medical practice, I routinely see very sick patients who are deficient in one or more amino acids,” says BodyHealth founder David Minkoff, M.D. Many people who struggle with protein digestion are also dealing with serious health issues such as Lyme disease.

An amino acid supplement can help fill the gap for those with Lyme disease for whom nutrition and digestion are failing to provide adequate amino acids, which are the building blocks of protein. PerfectAmino™, developed by Dr. Minkoff, is perfectly balanced and 99% utilized by the body to build proteins and support body systems.

In addition to this foundation, other supplements that are recommended by Lyme-literate experts include: probiotics; antioxidants (including CoQ10 and vitamin C); acetyl-L-carnitine; magnesium; chromium; and B-complex vitamins (including B6 and B12).

*These statements have not been evaluated by the FDA. This product is not intended to diagnose, treat, cure or prevent any disease.

Dr. David Minkoff
Dr. David Minkoff

Dr. Minkoff graduated from the University of Wisconsin Medical School in 1974 and was elected to the “Phi Beta Kappa” of medical schools, the prestigious Alpha Omega Alpha Honors Medical Fraternity for very high academic achievement. He then worked as an attending physician in infectious disease, co-directed a neo-natal intensive care unit and worked in emergency medicine until 1995. In 1997, his interest in alternative and complementary medicine led him to open LifeWorks Wellness Center, which has become one of the foremost alternative medicine clinics in the U.S. His search to find a source of the highest quality nutritional supplements led him to establish BodyHealth in 2000, a resource that could provide doctors with the best possible supplementation and education for their patients. Today, the BodyHealth products are used by hundreds of practitioners and individual consumers who seek all-natural wellness and detoxification supplements with a demonstrated high level of quality and effectiveness. In addition to their use by patients looking to heal disease, the BodyHealth products are also used by sports enthusiasts interested in achieving and maintaining optimal performance. As a 42-time Ironman triathlon finisher, (including 8 appearances at the Ironman World Championships) Dr. Minkoff has first-hand experience to help athletes achieve optimum conditioning. His expertise in protein synthesis, detoxification, and nutrition allow them to run, swim, and bike faster and longer. Today, Dr. Minkoff is an alternative healthcare expert, guest lecturer, writer, tv and radio show guest. He also authors two weekly newsletters, the BodyHealth Fitness Newsletter and the Optimum Health Report.


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