Successfully added to your cart!

Looking For A Unique 2016 Goal?

by Cherie Gruenfeld January 20, 2016 3 min read 0 Comments

Looking For A Unique 2016 Goal?

Make Someone Else a Triathlete!

by Cherie Gruenfeld

It’s a new year!

For triathletes, January holds the excitement of a brand new season. What 2016 holds in store for each of us is still unknown, and that’s part of the excitement.

That said, those of us who’ve been around a while do know one thing about the upcoming year which is that we will probably finish a triathlon of some distance. We know that because we’ve done it before – many times before, for some of us.

But I am reminded that there are many folks who have never done a triathlon and, if asked, would probably reply, ”That’s not for me. I could never do a triathlon.”

Recently, I was at a triathlon which is advertised as: “A distance for everyone!”  The weekend provided two days of racing which included an Ironman, a Half-Ironman, an Olympic, a Sprint and the Open, which was even shorter than a sprint. It was accurate  advertising - the two-day event welcomed all levels of experience.

On race morning I was introduced to a group of three 60+ women who were nervous about doing their very first triathlon – the Open. They were being guided by a fellow, much younger than they, who was an experienced triathlete. I watched as he walked them through the transition area, explaining what they would encounter there. He took them to the water’s edge and spoke about how to stay calm during the swim. Generally, he was keeping them calm and building confidence.

As race time neared, I walked down to the water and watched these three game older women as they entered the frigid water along with some very young kids, middle-age guys and others like them – of a certain age. What these people all had in common was: This was their very first triathlon. They were trained and they were ready – a bit scared, but ready.

As they came out of their short swim, every racer was sporting a big smile. The cold water hadn’t put a damper on their spirits. They were doing a triathlon!

Most were a bit shaky as they made their way out on the bike, some with helmets askew and jackets unzipped and trailing behind them. But the smiles were still there. On the run, they worked hard. After all, this was their first experience running after swimming and biking. There were a few grimaces, but those were quickly replaced by jubilation as the finish line came into sight.

I’ve been at many Ironman finish lines but they have nothing on the finish line of this  little triathlon. There was excitement and a grand sense of accomplishment, just as you see at the end of a 140.6-mile race. The emotions ran from relief to astonishment. It was truly a game-changer for each of these first-timers, whether they were six, sixteen or sixty-plus. Each was now “a triathlete.”

I’m sure that every one of these newbies had someone, like this fellow I watched shepherding the older women, to first convince them to give it a try and then to provide the coaching, motivation, inspiration, and hand-holding on race morning and to celebrate with them at the finish line. That kind of support assures the beginner of a successful experience and very likely adds a new triathlete to our ranks.

If you’ve never witnessed a first-timer reaching this milestone, I highly recommend it.

In fact, I challenge each of you to not only witness it, but to get involved. Become the one doing the convincing, coaching, motivating, inspiring, hand-holding and celebrating with them. Make it one of your goals for 2016. Trust me when I tell you that it will be one of your most treasured memories of the year.

If you’re wondering how to get started on this rewarding venture, it’s very easy:

  • Look around you. Do you have a spouse or a child who you could mentor through this journey?
  • Get them started quickly. With each new success comes more confidence about taking the next step.
  • Try to remember what it feels like to be a beginner. Help them to laugh at and learn from their mistakes.
  • Never forget this istheir experience. On race day, you’re not the racer. You’re thecoach, giving support from the sidelines.

You’re going to take this person, who felt he could never be a triathlete, on a grand journey, from the start line to the finish line.

It may just be a game-changer for you as well.

Enjoy the adventure

Good luck

Cherie Gruenfeld
Cherie Gruenfeld

Sixteen Ironman Age Group Wins Worldwide Nine-time World #1-ranked Amateur Ironman Triathlete. 2000 WTC Female Age Grouper of the Year 2001, 2007 USA Triathlon Female Grandmaster of the Year. Multiple-time USAT All-American Team (#1 Rank) "Everyday Champion" featured on Wheaties Energy Crunch cereal box. “My first triathlon was a Half IM in ’92 which qualified me for the IM World Championships in Kona. In ’92 in lived in Santa Monica, but now live in the Palm Springs desert with my husband, Lee, who is my biggest fan and supporter. He also writes and takes photos for the World Triathlon Corporation at many of my races. At the end of 2015, I announced my retirement from Ironman racing and am now focusing on 70.3s. My 2016 goal is to win the 70.3 World title in the W70-74 and setting a new course record.” For more information: http://www.cheriegruenfeld.com/



Also in BodyHealth

The Link Between Depression, Antibiotics, and the Life Saving Benefits of Good Gut Flora
The Link Between Depression, Antibiotics, and the Life Saving Benefits of Good Gut Flora

by Dr. David Minkoff September 24, 2020 6 min read 0 Comments

Physicians over thousands of years have observed a link between a patient’s mental state and how swiftly they recover. It is a long-standing axiom that people who are determined to get better and maintain a healthy frame of mind recover more quickly, with better results.

But what if we told you that it’s a two-way street? That specific health conditions can cause conditions like depression and anxiety?

In 1931, decades before the first antidepressant and antianxiety medications had been developed, a physician named Yaskin discovered that clinical depression is the earliest manifestation of pancreatic cancer. Further research demonstrated that patients who suffered from gastrointestinal malignancies carried the greatest risk of suicide – which was one of the first science-based flags indicating that the digestive system can have an impact on mental health.

Read More
Toxins, Eating Organic, and Your Athletic Performance
Toxins, Eating Organic, and Your Athletic Performance

by Dr. David Minkoff September 24, 2020 6 min read 0 Comments

The simplest way to reduce toxins in your body is to avoid them. Despite today’s crazy world that has toxins everywhere, there are steps you can take that will reduce your toxin intake. This gives your body a chance to get rid of the “backlog” and catch up.

  1. Eat ORGANIC. One of the most important ways to reduce toxicity is to eat foods that are certified organic. Not only do these foods contain higher nutrient densities to supply your body with what it needs, but they are free from the pesticides and chemicals present in most food.
  2. Avoid exercising and training in a densely populated city (when possible). As an athlete, your respiratory system is much more active – and training in a city with high levels of pollution means you are inhaling toxins just by breathing.
  3. Avoid any household products that have artificial fragrances. Artificial fragrances are toxic and should be avoided.
  4. Stay away from pesticides.
  5. Avoid highly-processed foods, as these are generally chock full of toxic chemicals.
  6. Stay away from products that contain BPA, which means avoiding plastic bottles, cardboard, and cans as much as possible.
  7. Avoid the use of non-stick cookware, as the coating contains harmful chemical compounds that can enter your food and be consumed.
Read More
Nature’s Medicine Chest: Elderberry Drops + Vitamin C
Nature’s Medicine Chest: Elderberry Drops + Vitamin C

by Dr. David Minkoff September 10, 2020 4 min read 0 Comments

Elderberry, also known as Sambucus nigra, has been used for centuries as a natural herbal remedy for those who fall ill.

Hippocrates, the father of modern medicine, referred to elderberry as “nature’s medicine chest,” and it has been noted as early as the 5th century BC as a medicinal tonic – forever cementing it as a staple in human nutrition.

But, it wasn’t until recently that we understood WHY it is so helpful to the body. And with this understanding came advanced methods of harnessing the incredible power of this medicinal plant.

Read More